Celerra NAS pool maxed out – manually deleting a filesystem

I recently ran into an issue that I will share with you since I was unable to find a solution online and resolved the issue myself. 

Issue: NAS pool maxed out and replications halted

When trying to issue a nas_fs -delete for a certain filesystem on a destination system, I received the following error: “file system has backups in use.” The reason you’re getting this error is either because the file system has a checkpoint schedule created or has replication checkpoints in use. In my case, it was the replication checkpoints preventing it from being deleted. Issue the following command to see the checkpoints associated with the filesystem:

fs_ckpt id=XX -list -all (where XX is the file system ID). Once you’ve identified the checkpoints that need to be deleted, issue the following command to delete them:

nas_fs -delete id=XX -o umount=yes -ALLOW_REP_INT_CKPT_OP (where XX is the checkpoint ID). Now, you should be able to go back and delete the file system with the “nas_fs -delete” command. If you go back to the source system and try to delete the replication, you will be returned an error that the destination side of the replication could not be found.

[nasadmin@NS480 ~]$ nas_task -i 648886
Task Id = 648886
Celerra Network Server = NS480
Task State = Failed
Movers =
Description = Delete Replication VNX5700_FS2 [ id=295_APM00110000_520_APM00130000].
Originator = nasadmin@cli.localhost
Start Time = Wed Jun 11 13:26:17 EDT 2014
End Time = Wed Jun 11 13:26:19 EDT 2014
Schedule = n/a
Response Statuses = Error 13160415862: The destination side of the replication session could not be found.

When deleting the replication session, use the “-mode source” flag and the replication session should now be deleted.

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